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Video conferencing quality is affected by a number of factors. One of the most important factors is the connection speed of your system. One best practice is to make sure your video system or desktop/laptop conferencing solution is hardwired to your network. This helps avoid wireless channel interference that can disrupt your connectivity.

Ensure that you have adequate bandwidth both upload and download, as this will affect the quality you present to the other participants as well as what quality you can receive from them. Avoid unnecessary file transfers, downloads, during a call; stock tickers streaming news and virus protections scanners have been known to produced unintended poor experiences when running in the background.

Traditionally, a speed of 384 kbps will achieve a lower resolution whereas call speeds of 1024 kbps will allow for high definition video with 720p resolution. You can check your connection speed by going to any speed test site. (There is also an app version.)

Be sure that it’s a website that gives both upload and download speeds. While it will help a video conference provider understand the issue, this may be up to your network team, your ISP, or the video conference provider to assist. But knowing the needed information will certainly help all needed parties diagnose the problem more effectively.

Remember that if you’re connecting from home, outgoing speeds are typically slower than incoming; whereas connecting from a corporate office would give you more symmetrical speeds. While some applications handle bandwidth requirements differently, the measurements provided are decent rules of thumb. But keep in mind that if desktop video is being used and you know you have 10 mbps both ways, downloading videos on YouTube, checking and sending email all take up some of that bandwidth. Finally, if you’re using new a new video conferencing platform or plan to connect from an entirely different location, do a test call and run a speed test to simulate the conditions. 

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